Will the Bitcoin mining industry collapse? Analysts explain why crisis is really opportunity

Bitcoin mining involves a delicate balance between multiple moving parts. Miners already have to face capital and operational costs, unexpected repairs, product shipping delays and unexpected regulation that can vary from country to country — and in the case of the United States, from state to state. On top of that, they also had to contend with Bitcoin’s precipitous drop from $69,000 to $17,600.  Despite BTC price being 65% down from its all-time high, the general consensus among miners is to keep calm and carry on by just stacking sats,…

China Can’t Seem to Stop Bitcoin Mining

In theory, miners turn off their machines whenever bitcoin prices drop significantly, and it becomes unprofitable to keep them running. This time, even though hashprice has decreased, we haven’t seen this sort of drop off, and we have the public mining company filings to prove it. Public miners have all publicly repped to something along the lines of, “We are mining bitcoin, we want to mine more bitcoin, we are going to hold as much of the bitcoin we mine as possible and we’re going to use other sources of…

Go green or die? Bitcoin miners aim for carbon neutrality by mining near data centers

Bitcoin (BTC) mining has always been a controversial topic. But, Bitcoin’s proof-of-work (PoW) model has reached new levels of concern as senior decision-makers and investors pay closer attention to environmental, social and governance factors.  As such, many crypto miners are highlighting environmentally friendly practices by acquiring carbon offsets. Yet, some would argue that this isn’t enough to guarantee green Bitcoin mining. Other risk factors may also be involved with carbon credits. For instance, Kevin O’Leary — the Canadian entrepreneur better known as “Mr. Wonderful” for his role on Shark Tank…

What Mining Moratorium Could Really Mean for New York’s Crypto Industry

“It’s troubling to me that a bill like this is directly targeting one specific industry. New York itself could use all the help it can get in generating jobs and keeping people here in the state, but also in developing new technologies and bringing the state forward,” Olsen said. “We’ve seen a lot of anti-tech rhetoric and legislation in previous years …[crypto] companies are just going to think ‘You know, it’s not worth it here in New York,’” he said. Author: Cheyenne Ligon Source link

Go green or go home? What the NY State mining moratorium could mean for crypto industry

On April 26, the State of New York put itself at the forefront of the regulatory struggle with crypto, as its Assembly voted for a two-year moratorium on crypto mining operations that use energy generated by fossil-fuel power plants. Depending on how one looks at it, this development could either signal a new alarming legislative trend or a trigger that would accelerate the digital asset industry’s movement toward a more sustainable path.  Moratorium with further evaluation The lower chamber of the NY state legislature, the Assembly, passed a bill that…